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25 practical ways to use Google Forms in class, school

Learning and creating

17. Logs (for exercise, nutrition, reading, etc.) — If students need to submit information in logs to track progress over time, Google Forms can capture that information easily. Create a form with the student’s name and all the information he/she needs to submit. Each time he/she submits, it’s logged into a spreadsheet where students can review that data and submit it to you.

18. Choose Your Own Adventure stories — By using branching (the “go to section based on answer” choice in the three-dots menu in a multiple-choice question), you can create fun Choose Your Own Adventure Story-type activities. Create them for your students or let students create their own! Here’s a math example from Mandi Tolen’s class.

19. Sharing examples in professional development — Teachers can use Google Forms to share their learning, too! During professional development, direct teachers to a Google Form where they can share their ideas, reflections or experiences from the classroom. Provide a link to the spreadsheet of results to everyone in the group. That way, when everyone’s done, each teacher can see everyone else’s ideas all in one place!

20. Answer with an image — With younger students, the old version of Google Forms was tricky because almost everything used text. Now, you can ask questions AND provide answers with images! Teachers can cue students verbally and they can answer by choosing the correct picture. When creating the form, just click on the answer to edit it and click the image button at the right. Here’s a VERY simple example of how to use images as an answer (click here).

21. Brainstorming with a word cloud — Provide a simple Google Form where students can reflect on what they’ve been learning, either with a sentence or a few individual words. When they finish, copy all of their responses from the spreadsheet and paste them into a word cloud generator like Wordle or Tagxedo. It will show the most common words larger in size than others, sorting the reflections of the class in a fun, visual form.

22. Personalized guidance via e-mail — Do your students (or teacher participants in professional development) need answers fine-tuned to their unique needs? Create a Google Form to let them choose the type of feedback they need, collecting their answers in a Google Sheet. Then, the Form Mule add-on can send them a custom e-mail response based on their answers. Basically, you write an email for every possible answer, and Form Mule sends it to them automatically when they submit the form. See more about Form Mule here.

23. Writer’s conference schedule — If your students need to schedule a time to meet with you to discuss their writing, the Form Limiter add-on can help. Create a form in Google Forms and it will gather the data you’ll need (name, class, time, etc.) in a Google Sheet. Form Limiter will stop accepting responses when specific Google Sheet spots are filled. No double-booking!

20. The Amazing Race, Google Style. This game is an intense mashup of Google Slides/Documents, Google Forms and Google Maps (optional). Students must complete several challenges provided by the instructor using Google Slides or Documents. Once the complete the first challenge in the slide presentation or document, they submit the link to the presentation/document in a Google Form. Once submitted, the link to the next challenge in the game is in a link on the confirmation page for the form. Clear as crystal, right? No? Check out this outstanding example by Michelle Green. Once you get it, this activity is super engaging.

24. Digital escape room locks — Use data validation to create a set of “locks” in a Google Form. This will make it so that the student MUST type in the correct answer in order to submit the form and “escape”.

Check out this post for 30+  FREE digital escape rooms (plus tips and tools for creating your own) Want to try one out before you dive into using them with your students? This Ditch that Textbook themed digital escape room was created by Mandi Tolen and Karly Moura. Try and see if you can break free from Ditch That Textbook headquarters!

25. Teach students how to make their own! — Show your students how to create their own Google Form and have them create one for their classmates. It’s a fun way for students to show what they know and creating the incorrect and correct answers levels it up. Who knows, they might even stump you!

Slide into science: Demonstrating learning with Google Slides

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